Dr Hardeep Bhatta & Dr Allen Friesen
Suite 205 - 1465 Salisbury Ave
Port Coquitlam, BC V3B 6J3
(604) 239-5954

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By Smiling Creek Dental
April 25, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: orthodontics   braces  
AnEarlyOrthodonticEvaluationcanReduceTreatmentLater

While most orthodontic treatment doesn’t commence until a child is older or entering adolescence, it’s still a good idea for children as young as 6 to undergo an orthodontic evaluation. An early orthodontic evaluation may reveal emerging problems with the child’s bite and jaw development, and help inform the best course of treatment when the time is right.

A specialty within dentistry, orthodontics focuses on the study and treatment of malocclusions or poor bites. Orthodontists are most concerned with the interaction of the face, jaw and teeth, and whether these structures are developing normally and in the right position.

It’s possible to detect the beginning stages of a malocclusion as a child’s permanent teeth begin to erupt, sometime between ages 6 and 12. Children at this stage may begin to experience crowding of the teeth (or the opposite, too much space between teeth), protruding teeth, extra or missing teeth or problems with jawbone development. While these tend to be congenital (inherited conditions), some problems can be caused by excessive thumb-sucking, mouth breathing, or dental disease stemming from tooth decay. In some cases, “interceptive” orthodontic treatment might be necessary during this early period to improve the chances that future treatment for a malocclusion or poor jaw development will be successful.

An early orthodontic evaluation should be undertaken no later than age 7 to be most effective. It’s also advisable to have regular checkups beginning around the child’s first birthday to spot developing teeth and jaw problems even when only primary teeth are present. The orthodontic evaluation itself takes advantage of an orthodontist’s trained eye to locate more subtle problems with teeth and jaw growth. Knowing this well in advance can make it easier in the long run when orthodontic treatment takes place when they’re older. Waiting until after the full emergence of permanent teeth and further jaw and facial development to evaluate for treatment could make it more difficult or even impossible to correct malocclusion issues found later.

The most effective dental care starts early in life. Not only treating immediate problems but also anticipating those that will require treatment later will help ensure your child will have healthy teeth for life.

If you would like more information on childhood orthodontic evaluations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Early Orthodontic Evaluation.”

By Smiling Creek Dental
October 22, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dental hygiene   orthodontics   braces  
MaintainingGoodOralHygieneWhileWearingBraces

Taking care of your teeth is a lifetime commitment, if you want your teeth to last a lifetime. But it can be especially challenging if you're wearing traditional metal braces. With a little extra attention, though, you can reduce the risk of dental disease during orthodontic treatment.

The goal of oral hygiene is to remove biofilm, a layer of leftover food particles called plaque that is a haven for disease-causing bacteria. Orthodontic braces make access more difficult for performing oral hygiene. A little extra effort and attention, though, can make a big difference.

First, be sure you're eating a healthy diet and avoiding unhealthy snacks (especially those high in carbohydrates) between meals; this will discourage the growth of bacteria in the mouth. You should also limit your intake of sodas, sports or energy drinks since their high acidity contributes to tooth enamel erosion.

Although more difficult for someone wearing braces, brushing is still essential to good hygiene. Begin by holding a soft, multi-tufted bristle brush at a 45-degree angle, and then brush the surface area between the gum and the braces all the way around. Return to your starting point and brush the area from the braces to the edge of the top of the teeth in the same direction. Be sure you do this for both the upper and lower jaw and on both the cheek and tongue side.

Flossing is also more difficult, but not impossible. Instead of conventional floss thread, you can use special floss threaders, small interdential brushes, or an irrigation device that sprays pressurized water to remove food particles between teeth.

Above all, it's important to keep up regular office visits with us. In addition to monitoring overall dental health, we can also apply or recommend additional fluoride products to help strengthen teeth or prescribe antibacterial rinses to reduce the mouth's bacterial level.

Keeping up a good daily hygiene regimen and regular checkups will ensure that the smile you gain from wearing braces is healthy as well as beautiful.

If you would like more information on oral hygiene while undergoing orthodontic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Caring for Teeth During Orthodontic Treatment.”

By Smiling Creek Dental
July 19, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: orthodontics   braces  
FiveThingstoKnowaboutOrthodonticTreatment

A beautiful smile has been proven to enhance your confidence and self-esteem. However, not everyone was born with the perfect smile. If you have an overbite, crowding of the teeth, too much space in between your teeth or missing teeth, then you may be a candidate for orthodontic treatment. With orthodontic treatments, teeth are moved into proper alignment by placing continuous, gentle forces in a carefully controlled direction with an orthodontic appliance.

Here are a few things you should know about malocclusions (bad bites) and orthodontics:

  1. Causes. In many cases, bad bites are simply inherited. Malocclusions can also be caused by skeletal growth problems, and in these cases, early intervention with orthodontics can make a big difference. Acquired bite problems can be caused by trauma, thumb sucking and any premature loss of teeth.
  2. Options. Nowadays, there are many different options available for those that require orthodontic treatment. In addition to traditional braces, which are applied to the front of the teeth, there are now braces that can be attached to the back of your teeth. Another popular option is clear orthodontic aligners, an alternative system to traditional braces that use a sequence of clear, removable and custom-fitted trays to gradually straighten your teeth.
  3. Age. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that children should be evaluated for orthodontic problems no later than age seven, as early detection and action helps to avoid more difficult treatment later in life. One out of every five orthodontic patients today is an adult, so remember that it is never too late.
  4. Time. While treatment time will vary, you can expect it to range from one to three years, depending on the severity of the problem. However minor tooth movement may take as little as six months.
  5. Maintenance. Remember that once your treatment has concluded, the work is not done. We will often recommend that you wear a retainer for a prescribed period of time to maintain your new, straight smile.

If you would like more information about orthodontics, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Magic of Orthodontics.”

By Smiling Creek Dental
May 30, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
ThreeReasonstoStraightenyourTeeth

If you've lived for many years with crooked teeth, you may think that your teeth will be this way forever. Believe it or not, one out of every five orthodontic patients is an adult and 75% of adults have some form of malocclusion. You're never too old to improve your smile, and here a few reasons why you should consider orthodontic treatment:

  • Self-Esteem: An attractive smile contributes to your confidence and self-image, and this is important at any age. Research has shown that, logically, the better you feel about your looks, the better you feel about yourself. You might not realize it, but those crooked teeth can cause you to be self-conscious, thus smiling and talking less. Studies have even demonstrated that orthodontic treatments can enhance your career opportunities.
  • Longevity: Though you can always expect a certain amount of wear and tear to your teeth from aging, properly aligned teeth will function better over time. If you are prone to gum disease, your problems can worsen with poorly aligned teeth. Not only is it more difficult to clean around crooked teeth, but we often see gum recession around poorly positioned or crowded teeth.
  • Options: If you choose to explore orthodontic treatment, you will see that much has changed since you were a teenager. Instead of traditional metal braces, we can sometimes use clear or colorless braces that are less noticeable. Some braces can even be attached to the back of your teeth. You may also be a candidate for clear orthodontic aligners, which use a sequence of clear, removable and custom-fitted trays to gradually straighten your teeth.

If you're considering orthodontic treatment, you should schedule an appointment with our office, so that we can conduct a thorough examination, discuss your options and recommend a course of treatment. We'll also make sure that your teeth and gums are healthy, an important requirement to successfully straighten your teeth.

If you would like more information about adult orthodontics, please contact us for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Orthodontics for the Older Adult.”

By Smiling Creek Dental
April 27, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: braces   retainers  
RetainersMakingYourNewSmilePermanent

Finally: Your braces are off! Break out the taffy, bubble gum, corn on the cob... and... whoa!!... the retainer?

Yes, the retainer. As the name implies, this simple device will ensure that your pearly whites remain in the new, desired position you've worked so diligently to achieve. Here's why:

The same physiological properties that allow your teeth to move when you're wearing braces are always at work — braces simply direct that movability in controlled ways. Teeth are not set into your jaw bone like posts fixed in concrete; rather, the root portion is attached to the bone by elastic periodontal (peri – around; odont – tooth) ligaments that permit micromovement of teeth all the time. The periodontal tissues are living; therefore, they are always changing and “remodeling” (just as hair grows, skin peels, etc.) When a light orthodontic force is placed on a tooth the following processes occur:

  • on the pulling or tension side, the periodontal ligament will activate bone-forming cells (osteoblasts) to deposit new bone to fill in the area from where the tooth was previously, and
  • on the pressure side, the periodontal ligament will activate bone-resorbing cells (osteoclasts) to remove bone allowing the tooth to move in that direction.

Visualize drawing your hand forward through water: The water parts in front of your hand and fills in behind it.

Once your teeth are in their desired position and your braces are removed, your teeth will tend to return to their old position if they are not stabilized or “retained” in their new one long enough for the bone and ligament to re-form and mature around them. This can take several months. In addition, orthodontic treatment stretches collagen fibers in gum tissues to some extent, contributing to the forces that tend to shift teeth back in the direction from which they came. The gum tissues will continue to exert this pressure until these tissues remodel. This can take longer than the bone and ligament stabilization, as collagen cells reorganize at a much slower rate.

Types of Retainers

The type of retainer you will use, how frequently and for how long will depend on your unique situation. The most familiar type of retainer is removable and one you may not have to wear all the time, at least after the first couple of months. In cases where the retainer is going to be needed for a long-term period, a common alternative is to have thin retainer wires bonded to the inside surfaces of the front teeth so they don't show.

Considering how much time, effort, and sometimes expense is required in improving your smile, the retainer is your assurance that it was all well spent. Even people getting a comparatively simple pedicure/manicure don't leave the salon without letting the polish dry!

If you would like more information about orthodontics and retainers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Why Orthodontic Retainers?” and “The Importance of Orthodontic Retainers.”

By Smiling Creek Dental
November 08, 2012
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: orthodontics   braces  
TeethStraighteningItsNotJustForKids

You didn't have your teeth straightened as a child. Is it too late, or should you have orthodontic treatment now as an adult?

Orthodontics is a sub-specialty of dentistry devoted to the study and treatment of improper bites, or malocclusions. Orthodontic treatment has the goal of slowly applying pressure to teeth in a way that moves them into proper alignment in your mouth.

Recommendations are for children to have their teeth assessed for orthodontic treatment before the age of seven. The whole process can be done more easily while their teeth are coming in and their jaws are still growing.

However, if your teeth are overcrowded, you have an overbite or an underbite, or your teeth are misaligned in other ways, it is never too late. If you “missed the boat” on orthodontic treatment before, here are seven reasons to consider doing it now.

  1. Orthodontic treatment brings teeth, lips and face into proportion, resulting in a beautiful smile.
  2. An attractive smile contributes to self-esteem, self-confidence and better self-image.
  3. Because of improved self-esteem, you may see improved social and career success.
  4. Teeth that are in proper alignment will function and wear better over the years as you age.
  5. Properly aligned teeth are easier to keep clean, making you less prone to periodontal (gum) disease.
  6. If you have any missing teeth that need to be replaced, this can be done more effectively if your remaining teeth are put into their correct spacing and position first.
  7. Current options for treatment include fixed appliances (traditional braces) in which bands and brackets are bonded to the teeth and wires are threaded through them — or as an adult you may be able to use removable clear aligners. These consist of a series of nearly invisible computer-generated clear plastic trays that progressively move the teeth into better alignment.

Take the first step: call our office for an orthodontic evaluation. Having orthodontic treatment as an adult may be just the thing to give you an attitude boost as you move forward in your life.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about teeth straightening. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Why Straighten Teeth?

By Smiling Creek Dental
August 02, 2012
Category: Dental Procedures
6FAQsAboutOrthodontics

Maybe you had braces as a child, or you are thinking of having your own (it's never too late) or your child's teeth straightened through orthodontia. But how much do you really know about this branch of dentistry? Here are six questions people often ask about orthodontia.

Q. How did the word “orthodontia” originate?
A. From Latin roots meaning “straight” and “teeth”

Q. Teeth are anchored in bone. How is it possible to move them?
A. Living bone is not unchanging. The bone, ligament, and the outer layer of a tooth's root (called cementum) react to the stresses of biting and chewing. Due to this stimulation the bone is constantly being resorbed (broken down) and rebuilt as it is pushed from one side of a tooth and pulled from the other. Under normal conditions, there is a balance resulting in a steady state. Orthodontia takes advantage of this process to slowly change the teeth's position in the desired way.

Q. My dentist talks about the periodontal ligament. What does this mean?
A. The ligament is a fibrous tissue that connects the teeth to their bone and takes part in the dynamic process of resorption and rebuilding of the bone.

Q. What kinds of conditions can orthodontia correct?
A. Treatment can improve the teeth's position and relations to each other (being too crowded or badly spaced) and the way the upper and lower jaws relate. It can enhance the appearance of a person's teeth and face, and can also improve the teeth's function in biting and chewing.

Q. What is the best first step to orthodontic treatment?
A. Talk to your general dentist about your concerns. If you are referred to an orthodontist, the next step is to assess your situation using molds of your teeth that show the way the upper and lower teeth meet (your bite). Special x-rays will be taken to show the locations of your teeth and relation of your upper and lower jaw. Your dental team may also use photographs of your smile and computer imaging to get a clear view of how your teeth are now and how they may be moved.

Q. What are some of the methods of treatment?
A. In the traditional method, small metal brackets are attached to the crowns of the teeth. Thin wires, called arch wires, are strung through attachments on the brackets. These wires are used to apply controlled force to direct the teeth in the desired direction. Another method is to use removable clear plastic aligners. A series of aligners is designed by a computer, to be changed from one to the next as the positions of the teeth slowly change.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about braces and orthodontia. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Moving Teeth with Orthodontics” and “The Magic of Orthodontics.”